If the U.S. foreclosure crisis were a baseball game, we’d probably be in the bottom of the fourth inning. That’s roughly the message from the latest data on home foreclosures and delinquencies released by an industry association Thursday.
The pace of new home foreclosures edged up again in the third quarter and the number of borrowers falling behind on their payments eased a bit, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. The good news was that the rate of borrowers who have fallen three or more months behind on their payments has dropped to about 3.5 percent of all mortgages. That’s down from a peak of 5 percent in late 2009. But it’s still three and a half times the “normal” rate of about 1 percent that prevailed before the mortgage meltdown hit in late 2007. “If you look at the pace of improvement I think we’re three to four years away from the typical pattern of seriously delinquent loans,” said Michael Fratantoni, MBA’s vice president of research and economics.
Since the mortgage meltdown began in 2007, roughly six million homes have been lost to foreclosure. (Estimates vary somewhat because multiple foreclosures are often recorded on a given property as the homeowner and lender try to avoid it.) Another four million homes are estimated to be at some stage in the foreclosure process. New foreclosures are currently started at the rate of about two million a year.
That pace of new foreclosures may begin to ease more, though. The delinquency rate –- the number of borrowers who have fallen behind on their payments — fell in the third quarter to the lowest level in nearly three years. For all loans, the rate fell to 7.99 percent from 8.44 percent in the second quarter. That’s down from 9.13 percent a year ago and the lowest level since the fourth quarter of 2008. Borrowers with subprime adjustable mortgages saw the biggest jump in new foreclosures in the third quarter. Some 4.65 percent of those subprime loans entered the foreclosure pipeline. That’s up from 3.62 percent in the second quarter, a 28 percent increase. The MBA said the rise was due in part to an increase in the number of loans that failed to get lender approval for a modification. Some states also ended their moratoriums on foreclosures during the quarter. Overall, the pace of new foreclosures for all loans edged up to 1.08 percent in the third quarter from 0.96 percent in the prior three month period. That’s down from 1.34 percent in the same period a year ago. A lot depends on the outlook for the economy which, though showing gradual signs of improvement, is not creating jobs fast enough to put much of a dent in the unemployment rate, which is hovering at around 9 percent. The uptick in the pace of foreclosures comes as the U.S. homebuilding industry is beginning to show a pulse three years after nearly shutting down. Though still on track this year to set a record low since 1960, when data were first collected, single family housing starts were up 3.9 percent, and permits jumped 10.9 percent. (Many economists believe permits are a better barometer of housing market strength because they are less affected less by weather and signal a pickup in future construction.)
“This was a good report,” said Patrick Newport, an economist at IHS Global Insight. “It has supporting evidence that the single-family market is finally getting off the mat.”
Continued improvement in home sales and prices, though, will depend heavily on the volume of foreclosed homes coming back on the market. Thursday’s MBA data showed that lenders have barely made a dent in the overall backlog of foreclosed homes. Since it began rising in 2007, the foreclosure inventory rate -– the percentage of loans in foreclosure -– has remained stuck at roughly 4.5 percent. That’s four and a half times the “normal” rate of about 1 percent of all homes in the foreclosure pipeline.
Not all of those homes will eventually be seized. Some foreclosures can be “cured” with a loan modification or by a homeowner catching up on missed payments. But the remainder will sit on a lender’s books until they can find a new buyer, often at a “distressed” price. Each new home that enters the foreclosure pieline becomes part of that “shadow” inventory. “The large number of homes still in the shadow inventory will cast a cloud over the housing market and the wider economy for a few years yet,“ said Paul Dales, a senior economist at Capital Economics. Dales figures there were something like 4.2 million homes waiting to hit the market at the end of the third quarter. As they do, they’ll continue to depress home prices, which have begun falling again after stabilizing this summer. Falling prices put more borrowers at risk of foreclosing as they burn through the remaining equity in their home and end up “underwater,” owing more than their house is worth. Some 11 million homes, or about 22 percent of all mortgaged homes, are currently underwater. Another 2.4 million have less than 5 percent equity, according to CoreLogic. Underwater borrowers are more likely to enter a so-called “strategic” default by simply walking away from their home and no longer making mortgage payments. The rate of that default varies widely from state to state, based on both housing market conditions and state laws governing a lenders’ ability to collect the unpaid debt. Some “non-recourse” states protect homeowners from those collection efforts. As more homeowners fall underwater, strategic default has become a bigger headache for mortgage lenders. A recent study by the MBA’s Research Institute for Housing America found that strategic defaults tend to cluster around homes already in foreclosure as friends, family and neighbors exchange advice on whether to walk away. “It’s a concern because of the manner in which it’s become part of the public conversation,’ said Fratantoni. Estimates of the levels of strategic default are all but impossible to make, the study found, largely because it’s very difficult to determine whether a default was truly “voluntary.” But the study found that one of the most critical variables affecting the pace of such defaults was the length of time a given home was in the foreclosure process. The longer that process takes, the longer the idea of strategic default has to spread from one borrower to another. Today, foreclosures can take several years to play out in some parts of the country, up from historical levels of three to five months, according to the study. “This is disastrous for a housing sector trying to recover from a crisis,” the MBA researchers said

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Dec

19

Facing Foreclosure? Don’t Call A Roofer

Posted by Rita Legan under

When your roofing needs to be replaced, you consult a roofing expert. When there’s a problem with your computer, you consult a technician who understands the issues of your particular model. And when a loved one becomes sick, you seek answers from medical professionals specifically trained in that particular illness. Similarly, in this current economic crisis, millions of homeowners facing financial hardship and possible foreclosure action are requesting the help of agents with the Certified Distressed Property Expert® (CDPE) designation. A CDPE is a real estate professional with specific understanding of the complex issues that confront homeowners in distress. Through comprehensive training and market experience, CDPEs are able to provide real solutions for homeowners facing hardships in today’s market.
Don't let the bank ruin your credit Call 440-227-4461
The prospect of foreclosure can be financially and emotionally devastating, and often homeowners proceed without guidance of any kind. CDPEs believe that in almost all cases, the best course of action for a homeowner in distress is to speak with a well-informed, licensed real estate professional. They have the tools necessary to help homeowners find the best solution for their particular situation. While enduring financial difficulties are challenging for any family, the process of finding a qualified real estate professional should not be. Rita Legan has achieved the CDPE designation, ensuring you deal with a professional trained to address your specific needs. CDPEs don’t merely assist in selling properties, they serve and help save their clients in need.

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If the U.S. foreclosure crisis were a baseball game, we’d probably be in the bottom of the fourth inning. That’s roughly the message from the latest data on home foreclosures and delinquencies released by an industry association Thursday.
The pace of new home foreclosures edged up again in the third quarter and the number of borrowers falling behind on their payments eased a bit, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. The good news was that the rate of borrowers who have fallen three or more months behind on their payments has dropped to about 3.5 percent of all mortgages. That’s down from a peak of 5 percent in late 2009. But it’s still three and a half times the “normal” rate of about 1 percent that prevailed before the mortgage meltdown hit in late 2007. “If you look at the pace of improvement I think we’re three to four years away from the typical pattern of seriously delinquent loans,” said Michael Fratantoni, MBA’s vice president of research and economics.
Since the mortgage meltdown began in 2007, roughly six million homes have been lost to foreclosure. (Estimates vary somewhat because multiple foreclosures are often recorded on a given property as the homeowner and lender try to avoid it.) Another four million homes are estimated to be at some stage in the foreclosure process. New foreclosures are currently started at the rate of about two million a year.
That pace of new foreclosures may begin to ease more, though. The delinquency rate –- the number of borrowers who have fallen behind on their payments — fell in the third quarter to the lowest level in nearly three years. For all loans, the rate fell to 7.99 percent from 8.44 percent in the second quarter. That’s down from 9.13 percent a year ago and the lowest level since the fourth quarter of 2008. Borrowers with subprime adjustable mortgages saw the biggest jump in new foreclosures in the third quarter. Some 4.65 percent of those subprime loans entered the foreclosure pipeline. That’s up from 3.62 percent in the second quarter, a 28 percent increase. The MBA said the rise was due in part to an increase in the number of loans that failed to get lender approval for a modification. Some states also ended their moratoriums on foreclosures during the quarter. Overall, the pace of new foreclosures for all loans edged up to 1.08 percent in the third quarter from 0.96 percent in the prior three month period. That’s down from 1.34 percent in the same period a year ago. A lot depends on the outlook for the economy which, though showing gradual signs of improvement, is not creating jobs fast enough to put much of a dent in the unemployment rate, which is hovering at around 9 percent. The uptick in the pace of foreclosures comes as the U.S. homebuilding industry is beginning to show a pulse three years after nearly shutting down. Though still on track this year to set a record low since 1960, when data were first collected, single family housing starts were up 3.9 percent, and permits jumped 10.9 percent. (Many economists believe permits are a better barometer of housing market strength because they are less affected less by weather and signal a pickup in future construction.)
“This was a good report,” said Patrick Newport, an economist at IHS Global Insight. “It has supporting evidence that the single-family market is finally getting off the mat.”
Continued improvement in home sales and prices, though, will depend heavily on the volume of foreclosed homes coming back on the market. Thursday’s MBA data showed that lenders have barely made a dent in the overall backlog of foreclosed homes. Since it began rising in 2007, the foreclosure inventory rate -– the percentage of loans in foreclosure -– has remained stuck at roughly 4.5 percent. That’s four and a half times the “normal” rate of about 1 percent of all homes in the foreclosure pipeline.
Not all of those homes will eventually be seized. Some foreclosures can be “cured” with a loan modification or by a homeowner catching up on missed payments. But the remainder will sit on a lender’s books until they can find a new buyer, often at a “distressed” price. Each new home that enters the foreclosure pieline becomes part of that “shadow” inventory. “The large number of homes still in the shadow inventory will cast a cloud over the housing market and the wider economy for a few years yet,“ said Paul Dales, a senior economist at Capital Economics. Dales figures there were something like 4.2 million homes waiting to hit the market at the end of the third quarter. As they do, they’ll continue to depress home prices, which have begun falling again after stabilizing this summer. Falling prices put more borrowers at risk of foreclosing as they burn through the remaining equity in their home and end up “underwater,” owing more than their house is worth. Some 11 million homes, or about 22 percent of all mortgaged homes, are currently underwater. Another 2.4 million have less than 5 percent equity, according to CoreLogic. Underwater borrowers are more likely to enter a so-called “strategic” default by simply walking away from their home and no longer making mortgage payments. The rate of that default varies widely from state to state, based on both housing market conditions and state laws governing a lenders’ ability to collect the unpaid debt. Some “non-recourse” states protect homeowners from those collection efforts. As more homeowners fall underwater, strategic default has become a bigger headache for mortgage lenders. A recent study by the MBA’s Research Institute for Housing America found that strategic defaults tend to cluster around homes already in foreclosure as friends, family and neighbors exchange advice on whether to walk away. “It’s a concern because of the manner in which it’s become part of the public conversation,’ said Fratantoni. Estimates of the levels of strategic default are all but impossible to make, the study found, largely because it’s very difficult to determine whether a default was truly “voluntary.” But the study found that one of the most critical variables affecting the pace of such defaults was the length of time a given home was in the foreclosure process. The longer that process takes, the longer the idea of strategic default has to spread from one borrower to another. Today, foreclosures can take several years to play out in some parts of the country, up from historical levels of three to five months, according to the study. “This is disastrous for a housing sector trying to recover from a crisis,” the MBA researchers said.
Source: MSNBC.com

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by Christopher Reale on October 4, 2011
We are again honored to have Christopher Reale, Director of Short Sale Operations at Lepizzera and Laprocina Title and Escrow Services, as today’s guest blogger. He is an expert on the short sale process and will share his knowledge with us on a regular basis. – The KCM Crew

Today’s ever changing real estate industry has brought upon some very challenging questions from our clients. We as counselors, want to put forth the best, non-emotional advice that we can, in hopes that we can help our clients and their families navigate the rough waters of the short sale process.

The most prevalent question and one that continues to permeate the industry is:

“Why should a seller go through the short sale process rather than letting their house be foreclosed upon?”

While we cannot speak to every client circumstance, we can say one thing with complete conviction. In almost all instances in which a potential seller is contemplating whether they should short sell their house or let it go through the foreclosure process, a short sale is the better option. The following are examples to consider:

Example A- Short Sale
Mr. Smith owns a home in which he has a mortgage balance of $220,000 and a current market value of $150,000. Mr. Smith has elected to short sell his property. His Realtor successfully obtains a buyer who puts forth an offer price of $120,000 (80% current market value according to Realty Trac Foreclosure Report 5/26/2011). After reviewing the buyers offer and the financial hardship information from Mr. Smith, Mr Smith’s bank agrees to accept the short payoff of $120,000 which would leave a deficiency balance of $100,000.

The transaction closes and is final. Mr. Smith then pulls his credit report 30 days after the transaction takes place. On the report he notices that the mortgage trade line states “Mortgage debt was settled for less than full” and the balance on the mortgage is $0. Mr. Smith is now on the road to financial recovery.

Example B- Foreclosure
For the ease of illustration we will use the same value and mortgage debt amounts as in Example A. However, Mr. Smith has elected to forgo the short sale process and let the bank foreclose on the property. The bank holding his mortgage facilitates the proper legal procedures to foreclose on the property, all of which are costly. Mr. Smith is notified and his property foreclosed upon of which is taken back by the bank to sell as an REO.

Six months later, the bank finally sells Mr. Smith’s home only they sell it for $90,000 (60% of current market value according to Realty Trac Foreclosure report dated 5/26/2011). Remember, as a short sale, the home would have sold for $120,000 keeping the deficiency to $100,000. In addition to the deficiency now being $130,000, the bank has elected to add on legal costs of $15,000 and asset preservation costs of another $5000 for a total deficiency liability of $150,000. Mr. Smith pulls his credit report 30 days after being notified that the bank has sold his property and of his liability.

On the report he notices that the mortgage trade line states “Foreclosure” and the balance is $150,000. Because of Mr Smith’s choice to choose foreclosure vs. short sale his road to financial recovery has taken a major detour. He not only has a foreclosure on his credit report but now has a much larger deficiency balance in which the bank, in most cases, will report on his credit report as a balance owed.

The Best Option is Clear
While the financial and credit advantages are clear when choosing a short sale over a foreclosure, other advantages are sometimes overlooked. The most important of all of them is maintaining the seller’s dignity and peace of mind. We have heard too many stories of families having to leave their homes because of a Sheriff’s order or some other type of legal action. The short sale process alleviates this negative social impact. The process puts the control back in the seller’s hands so that they can get back on the road to financial recovery and start providing for their families. In the battle of the two evils, a short sale always wins!!!

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[http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2011/news/1103/gallery.best_cities_for_buyers.fortune/4.html]
The 10 best cities for home buyers – Cleveland (4) – FORTUNE: “4 of 10Cleveland
¢ Real estate: It’s time to buy again
Rent as % of after tax mortgage payment: 132.6%
Median home price change, 2006-2010: -14.8%”

Presented by Rita Legan ASP Staging Realtor and eagent. In my Twentythree years of second generation real estate consulting, my guiding principle is “your success is my #1 priority”. My background in Corporate Relocation, Personal Real Estate Investing, New Construction, Marketing, Interior Design and Staging arm my client’s for making smart and timely decisions whether buying, selling or investing in real estate in the Greater Cleveland Ohio Southwest Suburbs. I am ready to earn your business. Call Now (440) 440-227-4461or email rlegan@kw.com or meet me on the web at www.RitaLeganSells.com

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